HealthTips https://allergiesvscold.com Updated Health Articles, Articulos de Salud y Bienestar, Fitness Tips News, Parenting Trending, Comer Vivir Bien y Saludable, Baby and Child Care Thu, 05 Dec 2019 14:33:26 -0500 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3 https://i0.wp.com/allergiesvscold.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/cropped-cropped-Healthy-Icon-512-x-512-Red-Copy-3-1.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 HealthTips https://allergiesvscold.com 32 32 115811984 Parenting in the age of ‘eco-anxiety’: Wildfire fears, and a deeper dread – The Washington Post https://allergiesvscold.com/parenting-in-the-age-of-eco-anxiety-wildfire-fears-and-a-deeper-dread-the-washington-post/ Thu, 05 Dec 2019 14:33:26 +0000 https://allergiesvscold.com/parenting-in-the-age-of-eco-anxiety-wildfire-fears-and-a-deeper-dread-the-washington-post/ In the mental health field (of which I’m a part), some clinicians might say I was experiencing “eco-anxiety,” and perhaps it’s true. Across the globe, worry related to a changing and uncertain natural environment is [...]

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In the mental health field (of which I’m a part), some clinicians might say I was experiencing “eco-anxiety,” and perhaps it’s true. Across the globe, worry related to a changing and uncertain natural environment is clogging up our minds, bodies and news feeds. To be sure, there is real cause to worry. If we do not act quickly to combat climate change, our future looks exceedingly grim: climate-related deaths, mass migrations, environmental devastation, extinction of species. But, other than managing this anxiety to whatever extent possible, are there really any better options?

As a parent raising two young children in California, I’m struck by the peculiar, often unsettling contours of this particular moment: how families are readying evacuation kits, attempting to fit child-size masks, discussing air quality indexes with neighbors — all while maintaining some semblance of ordinary life. At the root, a low-grade anxiety permeates. On the surface, we are resilient and functional.

This new “normal” can feel like a tightrope act at times, for both children and adults. As parents, we reckon not only with the frightening truth about what is happening to our planet but also with the gnawing uncertainty of our children’s futures. As parents, we hope for the best for our children, even as they have been strapped to this supreme burden — as if academic, social and economical pressures were not already enough. Although my oldest daughter is barely 5, I’m aware that navigating the what, when and how much to share with our kids about this crisis is just around the corner. Although excessive sharing can undermine kids’ mental health, too little of it won’t prepare them for the challenges of the future. These conversations won’t be easy.

In 2017, the climate crisis crept viscerally close to my home. Ash particles descended like snowflakes, and my husband and I fled town with our then-2-year-old, canceling her birthday party at the last minute and heading to a friend’s home in the mountains. The following year, my husband, who works closely at the nexus of human health, climate and the environment, invested in air filters for our poorly insulated house. Some days later, informing me that air quality in the Bay Area was worse than in Beijing, he drove our 3-month-old to a friend’s house on the northwest coast. For another day or two, I stuck it out with my older daughter, showing up at work as usual, trying to convince myself that everything would be okay if I just went through the motions. Eventually, we followed suit.

This year, at the start of what is now referred to by some as “wildfire season,” we ran familiar scripts in preparing for the pending shut-off: Keep windows closed, gas up car, fill cooler with ice, plant flashlights in strategic locations. Even as it all grows increasingly familiar, I am more on edge than ever. One night, I paused before getting into bed and texted our neighbors to let them know I was home alone with the kids. I was comforted by their reply: “We are home and have food and water for three weeks, including enough for you guys.” Over the course of two days, while both of my children were out, I finally organized an emergency kit in our basement, feeling hugely relieved, and infinitely more like a responsible adult. Instinctively, I didn’t involve my children in this project, although I wasn’t trying to hide the kits, either. When my 5-year-old asked me later about the large bins in the basement, I simply explained that they were supplies “just in case there is ever an emergency and we need to leave quickly.”

“Like the people who lost their homes in the fire?” she asked. I nodded.

The day I left my kids behind to set out on my trip, I felt nervous and guilty. How could I put distance between us if there was a risk of a wildfire breaking out — one that might harm or separate us? By reminding myself that there were no actual fires yet and that “public safety power shut-offs” were a preemptive measure, I could finally push off. Driving north on Highway 5, I passed by the town of Paradise, the site of last year’s devastating blaze, which stole 88 lives, 11,000 homes and more than 150,000 acres. Observing the scarred remains of forests with my own eyes — rather than in print or on a screen — was sobering. The sense of freedom I’d previously experienced on road trips wrestled with the gravity of the moment.

My time away was blissfully uneventful. On my drive home, a pink sunset streaked across the flat horizon, dividing sky and land. When I walked through the door, the lights were on. But the following night, we went black. In the morning, I tried to ignore the tightness in my chest while scrambling eggs for my daughters, packing a unicorn lunchbox, velcroing sneakers and dropping the girls off at school in a state of anxious anticipation — an odd juncture of the mundane and the apocalyptic. I’m not sure if my kids pick up on my anxiety, which tends to peak at night, after they are in bed and I have time to read the news and reflect.

In “Simplicity Parenting,” Kim John Payne offers “filtering out the adult world” as a strategy for nurturing young children. This resonates with me, although I also sense I’m on the brink of entering into a new phase with my oldest daughter, who is growing ever more curious, alert and resilient.

One night, despite the blackout, my husband and I set out on foot for a date night. Passing by street after darkened street, we descended a hill until crossing a power shut-off threshold. Lights suddenly flooded the darkness in the commercial zone. Restaurants and bars were open, and people sat together at tables, somehow rollicking with laughter. We could almost forget the wildfires. Almost.

“So what is our plan if we need to evacuate?” I asked. “We need to have one.”

“Well,” my husband said, “it depends on where the fire is. We need context. That will inform where we go.”

“Shouldn’t we just fly out of here for a week until things calm down?” I persisted. “I can book a flight, and we can always cancel within 24 hours.”

In that moment, amid the eerie revelry of the bar, I realized how this sounded a tad extreme.

In the end, we stayed. Despite fires hemming us in on either side, they hadn’t advanced in our direction, air quality was reasonably safe and we had power again. But the prospect of dealing with this uncertainty every year has raised questions about our family’s future. Should we stay and accept this as part of normal life? Or is it time to stop rolling the dice each year and hoping for the best? As an East Coast transplant, I can imagine living more comfortably in pockets of the country less compromised by climate change. Even my husband, who is more deeply entrenched in this community, is open to discussion.

Meanwhile, I’m not convinced that eco-anxiety is our enemy. When I startle in the middle of the night, I feel rooted to mammalian impulses, which is both humbling and significant at this time in history. If, as research suggests, some anxiety can actually benefit us by motivating us to act, could eco-anxiety be similarly adaptive? When people do not appear fazed or think it can’t possibly happen to them or that they are somehow immune, I find it deeply troubling. A bell is tolling, reminding us we should be alarmed.

As my daughters become more aware of the crisis we are living in, it is my hope that they will find ways to remain alert, engaged and balanced, while not slipping into panic. Learning to live with and manage anxiety — which is intrinsic to the human condition — is an important skill for kids to cultivate, after all. I consider it my responsibility, as their parent, to help build this type of resilience.

One night, the power outage in effect, I sat playing card games with my 5-year-old by flashlight. I had shared with her how, as a child, I used to play card games with my parents when the lights went out. She wanted to do the same. The next morning, my daughter rolled out of bed and cheerfully declared: “I wasn’t even afraid of the dark. Wanna know why? Because I had my eyes closed.” For just a moment longer, I say, let hers be closed and mine open. Her time will come — far sooner than I would like.

Ariella Cook-Shonkoff is a psychotherapist, art therapist and mother of two daughters living in the San Francisco Bay area. She holds a bachelor’s in English from Skidmore College.

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Book review: Parenting with data – The Jerusalem Post https://allergiesvscold.com/book-review-parenting-with-data-the-jerusalem-post/ Thu, 05 Dec 2019 14:33:01 +0000 https://allergiesvscold.com/book-review-parenting-with-data-the-jerusalem-post/ Like all new moms, Emily Oster wanted to give her newborn daughter the best possible start in life, but it didn’t take long before her baby’s incessant cries nearly defeated her. “I tried everything. Bouncing [...]

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Like all new moms, Emily Oster wanted to give her newborn daughter the best possible start in life, but it didn’t take long before her baby’s incessant cries nearly defeated her.

“I tried everything. Bouncing her more, bouncing her less, bouncing with swinging, bouncing with nursing. Nothing worked. I wondered if this was normal,” she recalls.

In this situation, many of us would have turned to parenting websites, or pediatricians, or family.

Oster did something else – she turned to hard data, scientific studies, and she applied the analytical tools she’d mastered in her career as an academic economist. Oster is an economics professor at Brown University, and her husband is an economist, and both of her parents teach economics at Yale.

From the research, she discovered that nonstop crying during the early evening was perfectly normal. Not only that, but Oster discovered that a baby could be soothed with a different brand of formula, probiotics or both.

Oster continued her foray into hard science, turning her into a calmer, more confident mother.

Eventually, Oster decided to share her newfound knowledge in Cribsheet – A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool.

Data-driven is an understatement. Cribsheet contains a full chapter of annotated footnotes, 291 of them in all, citing The New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, American Journal of Perinatology and more.

For Oster, that meant some hefty reading, including a whopping 900-page study published by the Institute of Medicine titled “Adverse Effects of Vaccines; Evidence and Causality.”

“Not beach reading,” Oster jokes. And the conclusion? Unequivocally to vaccinate.

Of course, not all studies are created equal. “How do you identify a good study?” she writes. “This is a hard question. Randomized trials, larger studies, more studies confirming the same thing tend to increase confidence.” And yet, at the end of the day, Oster must turn to her intuition.

“Sometimes you poke into a study and it doesn’t smell quite right.” Her goal is to look at relationships between disparate claims, to see when they are true and when they are not.

One example of a common parenting canard that the research didn’t support is the myth of nursing. Modern mothers are fed on the idea that nursing is the sine qua none of parenting, and that without it their babies are doomed. But a closer look at the data reveals that this is simply not true.

The reason that nursed babies do better is because their mothers are wealthier and better educated than bottle-feeding mothers. If those same mothers would bottle-feed, their babies would do just as well, says Oster. That’s certainly a great load off of the consciences of the many guilt-ridden mothers who either can’t or don’t want to nurse. Another surprise relates to allergens.

“PEOPLE IN the US have been told for many years to avoid exposing kids to allergens [peanuts for example] until they are older. It turns out that this advice is wrong,” she says. Interestingly, the research leading to this conclusion was done in Israel, where toddlers routinely snack on a peanut-based food called Bomba, and peanut allergies are rare.

Findings like that are part of the reason why Cribsheet is such a helpful book.

“My goal is to take some of the stress out of the early years by arming you with good information and a method for making the best decisions for your family,” says Oster.

And parents seem to be buying it. Released in April, Cribsheet is climbing its way up the bestseller lists, embraced by a generation of older and better-educated parents.

Academic papers are hardly scintillating reading, but Oster’s writing style is breezy and fun. She writes clearly and accessibly, sharing both her humor and frustration. The book is filled with anecdotes from her own life as a mother, including the day she brought her newborn daughter home, asleep in her car seat, without a clue as to what she’d do once the baby woke up.

For parents too bleary-eyed to plow through Cribsheet’s 348 pages, Oster offers handy end-of-chapter summaries she calls “the bottom line,” bullet-pointed lists summarizing her conclusions.

Because a happy baby requires a happy mother, the book gives considerable attention to mom’s healthy recovery, both physically and emotionally. Oster also offers advice for keeping the marriage strong after the baby arrives.
As a working mother, Oster is deeply concerned with the “work-life balance.” Rather than answers, she offers a method for making decisions. When Oster analyzes data, she asks three questions: What is best for the child? What do the parents want? And what do those choices imply for the family?

Oster urges parents to be true to themselves.

Like anyone who has written a popular book, Oster is not without her detractors. She has been accused of cherry-picking her studies.

“You cannot explain every study that exists. That would be a literature review and it would be boring, “she says. “On the other hand, I think it’s valuable to explain some studies in detail, since they help illustrate general points.”

She admits that data won’t solve every issue. “There isn’t good research about everything. What I will certainly say is that there are ways in which the literature on this is frustrating, and there are some very important questions about which we don’t seem to know as much as I would hope,” she says.

Interestingly, Oster’s most cherished piece of parenting wisdom isn’t data-based at all. She learned her greatest lesson as an anxious new mother while planning to take her baby daughter to France for vacation. Despite her scientific bent, Oster found herself frantic as she imagined everything that could go wrong. One scenario involved her baby daughter being stung by a bee and having an allergic reaction far away from a doctor or hospital.

 When she asked her pediatrician what to do, the doctor’s response stunned her.

“I’d probably just try not to think about that.”

 “I liked that a lot,” said Oster. “Sometimes you just have to accept that you cannot control everything. That’s hard, but it’s part of the fun.”

Just for the record, Oster’s baby, Penelope, was eventually stung by a bee and was totally fine.

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17 recetas saludables que puedes preparar en el microondas de forma fácil y rápida https://allergiesvscold.com/17-recetas-saludables-que-puedes-preparar-en-el-microondas-de-forma-facil-y-rapida/ Wed, 04 Dec 2019 14:33:48 +0000 https://allergiesvscold.com/17-recetas-saludables-que-puedes-preparar-en-el-microondas-de-forma-facil-y-rapida/ La falta de tiempo que tenemos con nuestro ritmo de vida actual resulta un gran enemigo de la salud, no sólo porque muchas veces representa un obstáculo para realizar ejercicio sino también, porque nos aleja [...]

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La falta de tiempo que tenemos con nuestro ritmo de vida actual resulta un gran enemigo de la salud, no sólo porque muchas veces representa un obstáculo para realizar ejercicio sino también, porque nos aleja de la cocina y la comida sana. Un buen aliado en estos casos es el microondas que nos permite preparar de forma fácil y rápida variados platos como las 17  recetas saludables que te mostramos a continuación.

Platos con verduras

Las verduras pueden cocinarse fácilmente y al vapor en el microondas, conservando todo su sabor y sus nutrientes, por ello, recomendamos estas recetas para comer más sano:

Bizcochozanahoria
Temas

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Cuatro momentos clave para descansar de tu entrenamiento de carrera https://allergiesvscold.com/cuatro-momentos-clave-para-descansar-de-tu-entrenamiento-de-carrera/ Wed, 04 Dec 2019 14:33:45 +0000 https://allergiesvscold.com/cuatro-momentos-clave-para-descansar-de-tu-entrenamiento-de-carrera/ Aunque debemos reconocer que nos cuesta dar espacio al descanso, sabemos que es un factor necesario para prosperar y cuidar el organismo. Por eso, a continuación te mostramos cuatro momentos clave para descansar de tu [...]

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Aunque debemos reconocer que nos cuesta dar espacio al descanso, sabemos que es un factor necesario para prosperar y cuidar el organismo. Por eso, a continuación te mostramos cuatro momentos clave para descansar de tu entrenamiento de carrera, es decir, después de los cuales lo correcto sería optar por el descanso:

  • Después de una competición: tras un esfuerzo intenso no sólo físico sino también mental y emocional como representa una carrera, el cuerpo se recuperará más fácil y retomaremos con más animo el entrenamiento si tomamos un día o dos de descanso.

  • Después de un entrenamiento intenso: tras uno o dos días de entrenamiento intenso, como pueden ser las series, necesitamos que el cuerpo se recupere, por ello, podemos recurrir a un descanso activo mediante un ejercicio moderado a leve o alguna actividad relajante.

Running: cuántos días a la semana descansar del entrenamiento y cómo hacerlo para sacarle partido también al descanso

Si has pasado o estás experimentando algunos de estos cuatro momentos clave, debes recordar que es momento de descansar de tu entrenamiento de carrera. En el equilibrio entre correr y descansar es de donde podemos obtener resultados.

La carrera es una actividad muy rutinaria, es decir, se repite siempre el mismo gesto. Por ello, después de esfuerzos intensos o de días corriendo, el cuerpo necesita descansos para no caer en lesiones por sobreuso. Además, descansar no significa no hacer nada , sino que puedes descansar de un día de carrera practicando yoga, nadando a ritmo moderado o pedaleando al aire libre.

En Vitónica | Correr o descansar, esa es la cuestión En Vitónica | Si eres corredor y te duele la espinilla, necesitas un descanso Imagen | Wikimedia Commons

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The Case For Better Meat https://allergiesvscold.com/the-case-for-better-meat/ Wed, 04 Dec 2019 14:33:42 +0000 https://allergiesvscold.com/the-case-for-better-meat/ It’s Giving Tuesday, and while I know the world is full of good causes, today I’m highlighting one close to my heart. It’s one I’ve contributed to significantly because it matters on so many levels. [...]

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It’s Giving Tuesday, and while I know the world is full of good causes, today I’m highlighting one close to my heart. It’s one I’ve contributed to significantly because it matters on so many levels.

I’ve spent nearly 14 years working against the tide of misinformation out there around human health and agricultural agenda. Diana Rodgers has worked tirelessly and creatively for the same purpose. She’s just launched a crowdfunding campaign to finish what I think will be one of the most groundbreaking, revolutionary documentary films ever—one that has the power to turn the public conversation around health and ecology. But she needs support to finish and distribute this film, and that’s why I’m sharing her campaign today.

Read more and watch her video to see for yourself.

Diana’s film, Sacred Cow: The Case For Better Meat, details the movement toward the greatest revolution in agriculture—a regenerative food system that supports the human need for a nutrient dense diet and the ecologically sound farming methods that mirror and contribute to the natural health of the land itself. 

Diana is a licensed, registered dietitian who’s spent the last 17 years living on a working organic vegetable and pasture-based meat farm, and all of her experience and study comes to bear in the film she’s created—a critical message that challenges the prevailing and destructive food system that undermines our individual health, our economic viability, and our environmental sustainability…and champions the intersection of nutrient dense food and regenerative food production for the good of human health and the good of the planet.

Below is Diana’s note. Watch the video. Read more on her site. Share her work and her crowdfunding campaign—and, if you can, contribute. Let me know what thoughts her work inspires for you. Thanks for reading today, everyone.

It’s official: I’ve just launched the crowdfunding campaign and I could really use your help!

As you know, I’ve been working super hard for the last three years on this project, without much of a break. It’s been a struggle at times, but it’s finally coming together – all because of you. Without you, this never would have happened! Thank you.

Please get in there and check out the new video with footage from the film, read about the film’s progress, pre-order my book, get a shirt, or pick up some meat!

SACRED COW CROWDFUNDING DEC 2019 from Diana Rodgers on Vimeo.

Research shows that campaigns that have early funding are the most successful, so if you’re planning on giving, I could really use your help today!

It would be incredible if everyone on this list would share with your friends and family. Let’s make this go viral!

All of the funds raised will go towards marketing the film so as many people as possible can access it easily. Click here to donate now.

Thank you so much for your support!

Happy Sunday,

Diana

P.S. If you were forwarded this email, please sign up here, so you can be the first to know of any updates (or fun campaign surprises!). I’d love to have you in this community!

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